ARGON
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Overview
Comment:Put in links to in-progress intro pages, so I remember they exist.

Elaborated somewhat on carbon and iodine.

Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk
Files: files | file ages | folders
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User & Date: alaric 2012-12-06 13:29:15
Context
2012-12-06
20:23
More elaboration of CARBON check-in: f22fe263a5 user: alaric tags: trunk
13:29
Put in links to in-progress intro pages, so I remember they exist.

Elaborated somewhat on carbon and iodine. check-in: 5b2e596027 user: alaric tags: trunk

2012-11-30
13:00
Added more detail to NITROGEN about failure modes and special cases, sorted out the reference linking, and clarified what states real-time tasks and device drivers run in. check-in: 7ae135dc3e user: alaric tags: trunk
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but because Mercury was the name of the Roman messenger god.</dd>

<dt>[./intro/caesium.wiki|CAESIUM]</dt>
<dd>Entities might also need to do things without being asked
externally - so CAESIUM provides a distributed scheduler, invoking
entity entry points using LITHIUM according to a schedule. The name is
a nod to the use of the element Caesium inside atomic
clicks. [http://argon.org.uk/caesium.html|old site page]</dd>

<dt>CARBON</dt>
<dd>TUNGSTEN stores entity state as sets of tuples; CARBON adds an
inference engine on top of that (like a PROLOG implementation) to
allow high-level querying. CARBON can obtain data from in-memory
temporary tuple sets, TUNGSTEN data (via WOLFRAM), or from tuple
stores published via MERCURY. The publishing of tuple stores is such
................................................................................
included in the implementation of MERCURY and TUNGSTEN to provide
low-latency high-throughput access in common cases; this is ARGON's
equivalent of the "sendfile" system
call... The name is a play on the way that Carbon is used by organic
systems to form complex structures, by analogy with the naming of
IRON, but emphasising the complexity and versatility of the structures
rather than brute strength. [http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2009/08/20/designing-a-global-knowledge-base/|conceptual
design]</dd>

</dl>

<h2>Userland</h2>

<dl>

................................................................................
space within the context of a single entity. However, a higher-level
infrastructure is needed to allow management of those resources, and
to manage other finite resources. AURUM is a set of software libraries
for managing them, including distributed operation by communicating
with "bank entities" via MERCURY. The name is, of course, a play on
the use of gold as a medium of exchange. [http://argon.org.uk/aurum.html|old
site page],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2011/05/13/aurum/|some blog thoughts]</dd>


<dt>FLUORINE</dt>
<dd>All of these lovely entities communicating via MERCURY are lovely,
but what about the rest of the world? FLUORINE is a toolkit for
communicating with standard Internet protocols and data formats. The
name is a play on the element Fluorine's extreme electronegativity,

which allows it to bind aggressively to other molecules. [http://argon.org.uk/fluorine.html|old site page]</dd>



<dt>IODINE</dt> <dd>This is a library of standard MERCURY/CARBON
interfaces for entities to provide user-level actions, such as sending
things to places. The name is a weak reference to the fact that many
of the interfaces relate to user agents that represent human beings,
and the letter "I" meaning personal
identity. [http://argon.org.uk/iodine.html|old site page]</dd>


<dt>NEON</dt>
<dd>Part of IODINE is the concept of a "user entity" that represents a
human being in the world of ARGON, but how does a human user actually
get the user entity to act on their behalf? NEON provides an interface
whereby a human interface device such as a laptop computer, tablet, or
mobile phone can let a user authenticate to a user agent, then allow
................................................................................
user. The name is a reference to the use of neon in brightly coloured
electrical signs, as graphical interfacing is part of its
responsibilities. [http://argon.org.uk/neon.html|old site page],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2006/08/23/neon/|some blog thoughts],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2010/06/09/user-interfaces-for-event-streams/|some
blog thoughts about events],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2009/12/16/personal-information-management/|some
blog thoughts about personal information management].</dd>


</dl>

<h1>Development roadmap</h1>

ARGON has been designed with sufficient modularity to allow it to be
constructed incrementally - in stages. Here's an approximate road map







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but because Mercury was the name of the Roman messenger god.</dd>

<dt>[./intro/caesium.wiki|CAESIUM]</dt>
<dd>Entities might also need to do things without being asked
externally - so CAESIUM provides a distributed scheduler, invoking
entity entry points using LITHIUM according to a schedule. The name is
a nod to the use of the element Caesium inside atomic
clocks. [http://argon.org.uk/caesium.html|old site page]</dd>

<dt>CARBON</dt>
<dd>TUNGSTEN stores entity state as sets of tuples; CARBON adds an
inference engine on top of that (like a PROLOG implementation) to
allow high-level querying. CARBON can obtain data from in-memory
temporary tuple sets, TUNGSTEN data (via WOLFRAM), or from tuple
stores published via MERCURY. The publishing of tuple stores is such
................................................................................
included in the implementation of MERCURY and TUNGSTEN to provide
low-latency high-throughput access in common cases; this is ARGON's
equivalent of the "sendfile" system
call... The name is a play on the way that Carbon is used by organic
systems to form complex structures, by analogy with the naming of
IRON, but emphasising the complexity and versatility of the structures
rather than brute strength. [http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2009/08/20/designing-a-global-knowledge-base/|conceptual
design] [./intro/carbon.wiki|work in progress on the intro page]</dd>

</dl>

<h2>Userland</h2>

<dl>

................................................................................
space within the context of a single entity. However, a higher-level
infrastructure is needed to allow management of those resources, and
to manage other finite resources. AURUM is a set of software libraries
for managing them, including distributed operation by communicating
with "bank entities" via MERCURY. The name is, of course, a play on
the use of gold as a medium of exchange. [http://argon.org.uk/aurum.html|old
site page],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2011/05/13/aurum/|some blog
thoughts], [./intro/aurum.wiki|work in progress on the intro page]</dd>

<dt>FLUORINE</dt>
<dd>All of these lovely entities communicating via MERCURY are lovely,
but what about the rest of the world? FLUORINE is a toolkit for
communicating with standard Internet protocols and data formats. The
name is a play on the element Fluorine's extreme electronegativity,
which allows it to bind aggressively to other
molecules. [http://argon.org.uk/fluorine.html|old site page],
[./intro/fluorine.wiki|work in progress on the intro page]</dd>

<dt>IODINE</dt>
<dd>This is a library of standard MERCURY/CARBON interfaces for
entities to provide user-level actions, such as sending things to
places. The name is a weak reference to the fact that many of the
interfaces relate to user agents that represent human beings, and the
letter "I" meaning personal
identity. [http://argon.org.uk/iodine.html|old site page],
[./intro/iodine.wiki|work in progress on the intro page]</dd>

<dt>NEON</dt>
<dd>Part of IODINE is the concept of a "user entity" that represents a
human being in the world of ARGON, but how does a human user actually
get the user entity to act on their behalf? NEON provides an interface
whereby a human interface device such as a laptop computer, tablet, or
mobile phone can let a user authenticate to a user agent, then allow
................................................................................
user. The name is a reference to the use of neon in brightly coloured
electrical signs, as graphical interfacing is part of its
responsibilities. [http://argon.org.uk/neon.html|old site page],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2006/08/23/neon/|some blog thoughts],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2010/06/09/user-interfaces-for-event-streams/|some
blog thoughts about events],
[http://www.snell-pym.org.uk/archives/2009/12/16/personal-information-management/|some
blog thoughts about personal information management],
[./intro/iodine.wiki|work in progress on the intro page].</dd>

</dl>

<h1>Development roadmap</h1>

ARGON has been designed with sufficient modularity to allow it to be
constructed incrementally - in stages. Here's an approximate road map

Changes to intro/aurum.wiki.



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Updated content will appear here shortly!
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<h1>WORK IN PROGRESS</h1>

Updated content will appear here shortly!

Changes to intro/carbon.wiki.



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While [./iron.wiki|IRON] is the model for individual particles of
data flying about an ARGON system, CARBON is the larger-scale model of
data en masse. CARBON is, at heart, defined in terms of IRON (a CARBON
knowledge base can all be encoded in IRON), and CARBON is all about
providing large-scale structure for bits or IRON data; but CARBON
deals with issues of <em>scale</em> that IRON need not concern itself
with.
................................................................................

<verbatim>!ns C </argon/carbon>

[C:object: </example/foo>
   title: "A nice name"
   language: "en"]</verbatim>

This is a relationship (<tt>/argon/carbon/object:title:</tt>) which can
bind a title to any object, in this case being used to bind a title to
an entity.

To give an example of abstract objects, imagine building a
Wikipedia-like database of useful facts about things at
<tt>/wikipedia/</tt>. We might want to talk about love, which we might
name <tt>/wikipedia/love</tt>. But there is no "love entity" that
represents love in the world of ARGON; love isn't available as a
software service (although you can rent a passable substitute, as they
................................................................................
or a string, but which also doesn't have a human-assigned global name.

For instance, an e-commerce system will need a way to identify things
like orders.

The thing to do in this case is to still identify the object with a
symbol, as it is not a concrete value; but to make a symbol up. This
can be done by making a symbol relative to the default namespace,

named with a meaningful prefix followed by a unique number (and
[./wolfram.wiki|WOLFRAM] provides us with Lamport timestamps which are
guaranteed unique within the cluster. As it's relative to the default
namespace, the symbol will be take relative to the name of the entity,
as that's the default namespace binding for [./tungsten.wiki|TUNGSTEN]
storage.

For instance, an entity called <tt>/example/shop</tt> might label its
orders <tt>/example/shop/order-1231223423</tt>. Ideally, as orders are
objects that one might perform operations upon (such as cancelling),
the entity should give its orders entity IDs (as personas of itself,
or by creating independent order entities) and assign the names to
them.


<h2>Compound objects</h2>

Although anything can be described as a list of tuples making
statements about it, that's not always the most efficient way of doing
so.

................................................................................
vectors as honestly as it can, but we can still do lossy
compression. If one follows the example of JPEG and breaks each plane
of an image into 8x8 cells, then performs a discrete cosine transform
on each and quantises them differentially to reserve more bits for
more important image components, you end up with an array of 8x8
arrays of small integers for each plane.

We can then represent each plan as a vector made by taking the (0,0)
element from each sub-array in turn, then the (0,1), then the (1,0),
and so on in a JPEG-esque serpentine transposition that will tend to
move all the significant information to the start of the vector, and
make the trailing end of the vector largely zero. IRON will then have
little difficulty in making a good job of losslessly compressing the
result, thanks to the lossy encoding of the image to begin with.

Compound objects allow for compact representation of things that would
be messy with tuples; homogenous vectors are the best examples of
those. But we also have compound objects that help with parallel
updates. For instance, we might be interested in counting how many
times some event has occurred. The naive solution is to have a tuple
containing the count:
................................................................................

<verbatim>[C:not [event: </example/foo> count: 57]]
[event: </example/foo> count: 58]</verbatim>

The <tt>C:not</tt> tells CARBON to forget the old tuple, and then a
new tuple is provided with the new count.

However, if we have two such updates occuring in parallel, both of them
might read 57 as the current value - and both would then write back 58
as the new count. The event has happened twice, but we've only gone up
by one. And we won't even have a clue, as CARBON will not store
<tt><nowiki>[event: </example/foo> count: 58]</nowiki></tt> twice - it merges identical
tuples.

However, if we declare:

<verbatim>[C:counter: </example/foo-counter>]</verbatim>

Then CARBON will treat that as an event counter object, storing a
numeric counter and a buffer for pending events, initialised to zero
................................................................................
replicas are reachable:

<verbatim>[C:counter-is-synchronized </example/foo-counter>]</verbatim>

<h1>Temporary KBs</h1>

Temporary knowledge bases can be created at will, and are stored
purely in RAM. They are just IRON opaque objects.


Tuples are stored within them, and transparently mapped to compound
objects where applicable.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about them is that they can "chain"
onto other knowledge bases (of any type), which will be consulted to
satisfy queries along with the main knowledge base. In the event of
................................................................................

Compound object handlers get to take over the TUNGSTEN storage of
their objects, so they can use appropriately compact and updateable
representations in terms of the B-Tree. They also need to store their
own update timestamps for individually updateable elements of the
compound object, so they can correctly maintain the current state.





<h1>Remote KBs via [./mercury.wiki|MERCURY]</h1>

TODO: Caching and bittorrent.

Note that the entity does not know its CARBON name, and has to be told
it upon every request, as it may have lots of them. The storage in
TUNGSTEN can represent symbols relative to itself by reference to the
default namespace specified before parsing it.









<h2>Magic super turbo performance optimisations</h2>

TODO: Direct access to the published TUNGSTEN sections, including
support for ACLs and personae (use the persona class). How stuff
that's not just static publishing is passed through to code that can
deduce things.
















<h1>The Directory</h1>

...and how it's bootstrapped.



<h1>TODOs</h1>


Roles for CARBON to cover:


  *  Storing a knowledge base in a TUNGSTEN entity section (including
     compound object support), merging in changes from WOLFRAM and
     handling conflicts with reference to Lamport timestamps.






  *  Storing a knowledge base in RAM (including compound object support).


  *  Accessing a knowledge base remotely via MERCURY (including
     compound object transfer - what do we do for compatability if new
     types of compound object are added in future?), and taking
     account of personae





  *  Providing the MERCURY remote knowledge base protocol via the
     LITHIUM short-circuit path, passing on to the underlying entity
     via LITHIUM only when needed for gateway rules, taking account of
     personae


































































Note that published CARBON data from entities comes from a section
called &lt;/argon/carbon/public&gt; and is made available to all
callers; but it is possible to declare (in
&lt;/argon/carbon/configuration&gt; other sections to publish with
given ACLs.

Talk about the ability to override parts of the namespace on a
cluster-wide scale.




Also talk about the subsequent ability to demand that a local copy of
any given namespace subtree be kept in the cluster at all times, in

effect overriding its original name. Note that CHROME modules list
their dependencies, which can be used to recursively local-copy them.




Such local copies do not change when upstream changes occur, but an
administrator can view a list of newly available things and opt to
upgrade, or downgrade. This is like "installing software".

The local copies are stored in one or more nominated WOLFRAM
distributed caches, with an infinite replication factor and no expiry
timestamp or drop priority so they are kept until otherwise
specified. By default, they go to the cluster cache, so are replicated
to every node.
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<h1>WORK IN PROGRESS</h1>

While [./iron.wiki|IRON] is the model for individual particles of
data flying about an ARGON system, CARBON is the larger-scale model of
data en masse. CARBON is, at heart, defined in terms of IRON (a CARBON
knowledge base can all be encoded in IRON), and CARBON is all about
providing large-scale structure for bits or IRON data; but CARBON
deals with issues of <em>scale</em> that IRON need not concern itself
with.
................................................................................

<verbatim>!ns C </argon/carbon>

[C:object: </example/foo>
   title: "A nice name"
   language: "en"]</verbatim>

This is a relationship (<tt>/argon/carbon/object:title:language:</tt>)
which can bind a title to any object, in this case being used to bind
a title to an entity.

To give an example of abstract objects, imagine building a
Wikipedia-like database of useful facts about things at
<tt>/wikipedia/</tt>. We might want to talk about love, which we might
name <tt>/wikipedia/love</tt>. But there is no "love entity" that
represents love in the world of ARGON; love isn't available as a
software service (although you can rent a passable substitute, as they
................................................................................
or a string, but which also doesn't have a human-assigned global name.

For instance, an e-commerce system will need a way to identify things
like orders.

The thing to do in this case is to still identify the object with a
symbol, as it is not a concrete value; but to make a symbol up. This
can be done by making a symbol relative to a single assigned namespace
chosen for the purpose (eg, <tt>/com/mycompany/orders</tt>), named with
a meaningful prefix followed by a unique number (and
[./wolfram.wiki|WOLFRAM] provides us with Lamport timestamps which are
guaranteed unique within the cluster). So the end result might be

symbols like <tt>/com/mycompany/orders/id-2827391</tt>.




Ideally, as orders are objects that one might perform operations upon
(such as cancelling), the shop entity should give its orders entity
IDs (as personae of itself, or by creating independent order entities)

and assign the names to them.

<h2>Compound objects</h2>

Although anything can be described as a list of tuples making
statements about it, that's not always the most efficient way of doing
so.

................................................................................
vectors as honestly as it can, but we can still do lossy
compression. If one follows the example of JPEG and breaks each plane
of an image into 8x8 cells, then performs a discrete cosine transform
on each and quantises them differentially to reserve more bits for
more important image components, you end up with an array of 8x8
arrays of small integers for each plane.

We can then represent each plane as a vector made by taking the (0,0)
element from each sub-array in turn, then the (0,1), then the (1,0),
and so on in a JPEG-esque serpentine transposition that will tend to
move all the significant information to the start of the vector, and
make the trailing end of the vector largely zero. IRON will then have
little difficulty in making a good job of losslessly compressing the
result, thanks to the lossy encoding of the image.

Compound objects allow for compact representation of things that would
be messy with tuples; homogenous vectors are the best examples of
those. But we also have compound objects that help with parallel
updates. For instance, we might be interested in counting how many
times some event has occurred. The naive solution is to have a tuple
containing the count:
................................................................................

<verbatim>[C:not [event: </example/foo> count: 57]]
[event: </example/foo> count: 58]</verbatim>

The <tt>C:not</tt> tells CARBON to forget the old tuple, and then a
new tuple is provided with the new count.

However, if we have two such updates occuring in parallel, both of
them might read 57 as the current value - and both would then write
back 58 as the new count. The event has happened twice, but we've only
gone up by one. And we won't even have a clue, as CARBON will not
store <tt><nowiki>[event: </example/foo> count: 58]</nowiki></tt>
twice - it merges identical tuples.

However, if we declare:

<verbatim>[C:counter: </example/foo-counter>]</verbatim>

Then CARBON will treat that as an event counter object, storing a
numeric counter and a buffer for pending events, initialised to zero
................................................................................
replicas are reachable:

<verbatim>[C:counter-is-synchronized </example/foo-counter>]</verbatim>

<h1>Temporary KBs</h1>

Temporary knowledge bases can be created at will, and are stored
purely in RAM. They are just IRON objects with an opaque internal
structure.

Tuples are stored within them, and transparently mapped to compound
objects where applicable.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about them is that they can "chain"
onto other knowledge bases (of any type), which will be consulted to
satisfy queries along with the main knowledge base. In the event of
................................................................................

Compound object handlers get to take over the TUNGSTEN storage of
their objects, so they can use appropriately compact and updateable
representations in terms of the B-Tree. They also need to store their
own update timestamps for individually updateable elements of the
compound object, so they can correctly maintain the current state.

Note that the entity does not know its own CARBON name, as it might
not have one or might have many, so when opening a TUNGSTEN section
KB, an initial value for the default namespace needs to be supplied.

<h1>Remote KBs via [./mercury.wiki|MERCURY]</h1>

TODO: Caching and bittorrent.

Note that as the CARBON protocol opens up TUNGSTEN knowledge base
sections, it needs to know an initial default namespace - so the
CARBON name being used to access the entity must be supplied in
requests. If there is none (eg, we are just working from a raw EID),
then that EID is mapped into a CARBON symbol of the form
<tt><nowiki>/argon/eid/VERSION NUMBER/CLUSTER ID IN
BASE64[/CLUSTER-LOCAL PART OF ENTITY ID IN BASE64[/PERSONA
CLASS/PERSONA PARAMETERS IN BASE64]]</nowiki></tt>. <tt>/argon/eid</tt>
offers a gateway that resolves these names back to the encoded entity
IDs; if no cluster-local part is provided, then an empty string is
used, producing the EID of the cluster entity corresponding to the
cluster.

<h2>Magic super turbo performance optimisations</h2>

TODO: Direct access via MERCURY to the published TUNGSTEN sections,
including support for ACLs and personae (use the persona


class). Sketch the framework of support for a CDN by configuring the
cluster to forward the published TUNGSTEN sections of a configured
list of its entities out to nominated caching servers, and how clients
can be configured to contact caching servers.

How rules can be written whose body is not another CARBON query, but
instead a pointer to a request that is sent via MERCURY back to the
origin entity, actually causing entity code to run. This is necessary
for the interesting cases where we're not just publishing information
via CARBON, but instead exposing an actual service that generates or
otherwise obtains information on demand, ranging from computational
services, access to continuously-changing information sources such as
sensors, processes that require access to secret information to
generat a result, access to existing information systems (such as
gateways to the Internet or "legacy systems"), and so on.

<h1>The Directory</h1>


A single global root EID, run by a non-profit foundation with a
suitable governance structure to prevent it ever being monopolised.


<dl>


<dt><tt>/argon</tt></dt>




<dd>Where ARGON system software is published from. This is delegated
to a non-profit foundation (which may or may not be the same one as
providing the root) which FIXME: Read these
documents and gather together all the CARBON names described in them,
and document them fully here.</dd>


<dt><tt>/org</tt></dt>





<dd>Where global non-profit organisations can register their own subtrees,
for a small registration fee to the foundation and a small annual fee,
to cover costs and to make sure failed organisations release their
names back into the pool.</dd>





<dt><tt>/com</tt></dt>

<dd><tt>Where global companies can register their own subtrees, for a
less small registration fee and annual fee, but still easily
affordable for startups.</dd>

<dt><tt>/gov</tt></dt>

<dd><tt>Where international public bodies can register their own
subtrees, for no fee but needing to prove their identity.</dd>

<dt><tt>/me</tt></dt>

<dd>Where anyone who doesn't want to tie their identity to a
particular country can register a name, for a small cost-price setup
fee and an annual renewal that costs nothing and just involves
confirming continued usage (and which might only be required if no
other evidence of continued usage can be found automatically). There
is no restriction on registration under this prefix - corporations are
welcome to, but <tt>/com</tt> looks better. Registrations are
strictly anonymous under <tt>/me</tt>, with all that implies.</dd>

<dt><tt>/&lt;ISO two-letter country code&gt;/[org|com|gov|me]</tt></dt>

<dd>As above, but deliberately choosing to associated with a given
geographical jurisdiction. The markup on registration and renewal
fees, where it exists, is reduced slightly.</dd>

<dt><tt>/example</tt></dt>

<dd>A name that will never be bound, except perhaps to an information
marker, used purely for examples without fear of it ever clashing with
anything.</dd>

<dt><tt>/home</tt></dt>

<dd>A name that will never be bound in the global directory, except
perhaps to an informational marker, reserved as a place for a local
override to be presented by user interfaces in order to display
information relevant to the context the user interface is in - eg,
resources inside the user agent itself, the user's own CARBON space
under their user agent entity, links to the user's bookmarked
CARBON names, and resources relating to the user interface device
being used to interact with the user agent, such as auto-discovered
resources on the local network, hardware devices attached to the user
interface device, and resources administratively configured into the
user interface service such as the nearest printer, information
resources about the building containing the device or the organisation
providing it, etc.</dd>

<dt><tt>[./fluorine.wiki|FLUORINE] gateways</tt></dt>

<dd>For convenience, we should give these top-level names.</dd>

</dl>

It would be nice to also reserve a top-level prefix for some kind of
distributed name system, which can even be implemented by a local
override pointing to a local copy of the entity gatewaying into it so
that the foundation cannot be used to control it. <tt>/argon/eid</tt>
is one such, with ugly-looking names. It might be nice to have one
that works like tor onion URLs, and maybe one based on something like
namecoin, and so on.

<h1>TODOs</h1>

Note that published CARBON data from entities comes from a section
called &lt;/argon/carbon/public&gt; and is made available to all
callers; but it is possible to declare (in
&lt;/argon/carbon/configuration&gt; other sections to publish with
given ACLs.

Talk about the ability to override parts of the namespace on a
cluster-wide scale, configuring a list of CARBON namespace roots, each
with the EID of the entity to "splice" into the tree at that
point. The actual root of the global CARBON directory is configured in
at this point, by having a mapping for &lt;/&gt;.

Also talk about the subsequent ability to demand that a local copy of
any given namespace subtree be kept in the cluster at all times, in
effect overriding its original name but pointing to a snapshot stored
within the cluster. Note that CHROME modules list
their dependencies, which can be used to recursively local-copy
them. This is used to ensure that critical resources are available
"offline", and to configure the cluster to use a specific version of
something rather than "the latest".

Such local copies do not change when upstream changes occur, but an
administrator can view a list of newly available things and opt to
upgrade, or downgrade. This is like "installing software".

The local copies are stored in one or more nominated WOLFRAM
distributed caches, with an infinite replication factor and no expiry
timestamp or drop priority so they are kept until otherwise
specified. By default, they go to the cluster cache, so are replicated
to every node.

Changes to intro/fluorine.wiki.



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Updated content will appear here shortly!

IODINE is a list of standard entity interfaces, defined as MERCURY
interfaces and CARBON tuples that the entity is expected to provide.

<h1>SEE ALSO</h1>

MERCURY defines a protocol by which an entity may publish
................................................................................
different languages, etc. Look at Dublin Core for inspiration.

Also, CARBON defines the containment/link relationship used to form
the CARBON namespace used for IRON symbols (based around short names).

<h1><tt>/argon/iodine/push</tt>: Object Push</h1>

Here, have an object!













<h1><tt>/argon/iodine/directory</tt>: CARBON directory</h1>

A user-manageable CARBON directory node, as opposed to one that
generates the directory links programmatically.

Link to entity. Edit list of linked entities and their local metadata.
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<h1>WORK IN PROGRESS</h1>

IODINE is a list of standard entity interfaces, defined as MERCURY
interfaces and CARBON tuples that the entity is expected to provide.

<h1>SEE ALSO</h1>

MERCURY defines a protocol by which an entity may publish
................................................................................
different languages, etc. Look at Dublin Core for inspiration.

Also, CARBON defines the containment/link relationship used to form
the CARBON namespace used for IRON symbols (based around short names).

<h1><tt>/argon/iodine/push</tt>: Object Push</h1>

Here, have an object, represented as a CARBON knowledge bundle full of
statements about the object (which is identified as the default
namespace binding when the bundle is interpreted)!

Usable for all sorts of sending tasks. To a user agent, it can be used
to send emails, workflow tasks, appointment invitiations, etc. It's
also the logical interface to use for printing; object push something
to the printer. A CARBON directory might accept an Object Push (from
somebody with sufficient rights) by creating a directed link if an
entity ID is pushed. Entities containing user-editable information
might accept general bundle pushes containing no explicit object (eg,
no statements about the object at the default namespace prefix), but
full of metadata about other objects, too.

<h1><tt>/argon/iodine/directory</tt>: CARBON directory</h1>

A user-manageable CARBON directory node, as opposed to one that
generates the directory links programmatically.

Link to entity. Edit list of linked entities and their local metadata.